TriVita

Will the rest of the “story” be meaningful?

Posted on: February 2, 2015

“If you watched a movie about a guy who wanted a Volvo and worked for years to get it, you would not cry at the end when he drove off the lot testing the windshield wipers. Nobody cries at the end of the movie about a guy who wants a Volvo. But we actually spend years actually living these stories, and expect our lives to be meaningful. The truth is, if what we choose to do with our lives won’t make a story meaningful, it won’t make a life meaningful either.” These are the words of Donald Miller in his book, “What I learned while editing my life.”

I laughed and have to admit I cried as I read this book illustrating how every life is a story. Each of our lives is like a blank page; what we do in our lives is the story we write upon this page. This concept moved the “life purpose” message I have shared for 15 years in TriVita to a whole new paradigm and made it so much more personal. There is no waiting for the “aha” moment for purpose to be revealed or discovered. No escaping finding purpose because of the daily responsibilities. No, each one of us is the character in our developing story. And what we have done so far in life has established the story to this point and how meaningful our lives have been. The exciting question each of us gets to answer is, what will be the rest of the story and will it be meaningful?

Susan and I are here in Hawaii celebrating her birthday. I am here recovering from a hernia surgery. No golf, no marlin fishing, no gym visits pushing my limit. So I decided to join with Donald Miller and discover what I could learn while editing my life. Most of us are way too busy to take a couple days to reflect but since I can’t really do the things I love to do here in Hawaii, it provided the opportune time. I would like to share what I learned. Not what I learned about my life, but what I learned about “the Story” of our lives. Maybe it will tweak your interest and someday you will take a couple days and reflect on your own story. If you have gone to a good movie or have read a great book you will find the story points I am sharing with you very familiar. And actually they can help you write the rest of your story.

A good story has to have a character who wants something and overcomes conflict to get it. The character does not just advance in the story, they must be forced. The inciting incident is the doorway they were forced to go through to have the courage to deal with the conflicting issues of life and overcome them. Humans naturally seek comfort and stability but that is boring and won’t make life meaningful; neither will it cause you to cry or laugh at your story. Great stories are “written” by those who do not give in to fear. A great story must advance the character toward what they want, even if very slowly. The story must have the suspense of risk and a question of will they make it?

Watching a movie or reading a book with such suspense and with the question will they succeed is enjoyable and memorable; living the story is much more agonizing, unless of course you as the character in your story are surrendered to the Writer!

Michael

 

1 Response to "Will the rest of the “story” be meaningful?"

Hope your restful vacation is perfection! You know how often you hear it is important to “be still” to hear God? Enjoy the down time, so important to enable our body’s amazing ability to heal…and what a beautiful place to enjoy His creation.
I could not agree more with this blog. Being forced into a new life…into a new way of living is not comfortable. The key is to have faith…TriVita’s Essentials 8, 9, & 10 are true tenents to live life by.

Happy Birthday Susan and here’s to perfect healing, Sue

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